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While each child with Asperger’s is unique, there are clusters of challenges often associated with the diagnosis. The following techniques have been successful with my son, my patients, or both. Every child is wonderfully different, so kids’ responses will vary. Fortunately, there are a lot of things to try and I frequently add more.

Academics/School: writing, math, organization, time management, and practical problem-solving.

Communication: sending/receiving non-verbal signals though eye contact, facial expression, and tone of voice. Taking turns in conversation, tailoring communication to the listener and situation, and staying on topic.

Sensory: processing information using all five senses, managing sensitivity to sounds and touch, and developing a sense of well-being through tactile experiences.

Social: putting one’s self in another’s shoes, seeing past the literal meaning of what someone else is saying, understanding sarcasm and the use of idioms, developing scripts for difficult situations, and modifying literal interpretations.

Thinking: avoiding “black-and-white” or “all-or-nothing thinking”, distilling the general idea from a mass of detail, and seeing things from others’ perspectives.

Feelings: describing feelings, distinguishing feelings from thoughts, managing stress, expressing feelings constructively, and recognizing and understanding feelings in others.

 

Learning from bees. Some children with ASD do not recognize a need to improve their social skills. How to explain what’s in it for them. Learn more.

What stimulates sensory systems, muscles and is calming to lie on top of? Stability balls. Learn more.

Losing track of time. Help your child with time management by making it visual. Learn more.

Addressing anxiety, depression, anger and low self-esteem. A game which can be used to help modify emotions. Learn more.